Your Dreams May Vary

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Bryna Turner
“My newest play, Bull in a China Shop, is a queer history play inspired by the real-life letters between Mary Woolley and Jeannette Marks spanning from 1899 to 1937. I wrote the majority of it in the twenty-four hours immediately following the dissolution of a five-year relationship. I sat down with a friend and swore that I would never write again—and then I suddenly wrote this play about growing older, idealism, identity, ambition, yearning, love, revolution, reform, shifting politics, and time passing so quickly we hardly notice we’re not the people we used to be.”
Bryna Turner

Bryna Turner grew up in Fort Bragg watching her dad, mom, and three siblings follow their various, varied, surprising dreams. She followed hers down equally divergent paths to find success as the twenty-seven-year-old author of a lauded New York play, Bull In A China Shop, heading for Chicago in May, and playing in Mendocino this summer. Lincoln Center of the Arts awarded the coveted Emerging Artists Award for 2018 to Bryna, one of only eleven artists in the country to earn the honor.

When my dad was growing up, he thought he wanted to be a lawyer like his father. And yet, he was always thinking up and executing business plans. He ran a paper route so well he quickly began subcontracting neighborhood kids to work for him. He started a backyard circus that cost a nickel for entrance, and then ran the grill himself, making a killing selling hotdogs. He was a young inventor too—he made a small device to electrocute his brothers who had their own weapons of choice—Andy’s throwing knives and Scott’s blow dart. By the time he was studying political science at Stanford University, he had no plans to go into business. But when he walked into a summer job at a waterbed store only to have the owner call him from Mexico offering to sell him the business at cost, Dave Turner knew he had to seize the opportunity.

The Latex Mattress Invention

Almost forty years later, my dad has taken the business through many iterations. It has transitioned from a waterbed store, to a wholesale mattress delivery operation, to what it is today: a business making high-end customizable latex mattresses. But no transition was as dramatic as the decision to move from the Bay Area to Fort Bragg, California. As the youngest of Dave and Anne Turner’s four children, I’ve often wondered: why in the world did they do it?

“We wanted to raise our children in a community,” Dave says. “Katie and Dewey were about to enter middle school, and we didn’t want them going to schools with metal detectors,” Anne says. The truth is: my dad was born in Fort Bragg, CA and he wanted his kids to have access to the same kind of small town childhood he enjoyed. And once back in Fort Bragg, my dad returned to one of his own childhood hobbies: inventing. Within a few years, he’d developed a patent for a hospital bed. Eager to get the idea out into the world, but reluctant to leave his family for long periods of time peddling the product on the road, he turned to a brand new technology in 1995: the internet.

“I thought I’d be able to get the attention of hospitals online, but instead, I got people from all over the world looking for a good mattress”—and so my dad got to work developing a mattressWoodshop Rocky... one of the Top Menperfect for individuals. Today, the Flobed is one of the most customizable mattresses on the market. And it’s all made here in Fort Bragg, California, making it one of the only local manufacturers left on the coast.

My dad’s business ethos is surprisingly simple: “everyone is built differently; your mattress should be too.” But his attention to difference, his insistence on listening to what each person needs and not trying to solve individual problems with a one-size-fits-all solution—that’s the key to his and my mother’s parenting too. Or, at least, it’s the only answer I can come with to explain how different each of us four kids have turned out to be.

Take my sister, Katie Turner-Carr, for example. Like our father, her entrepreneur spirit started young—with lemonade stands, and a keen sense of business. But it was our mother’s footsteps she thought she’d follow in.

Anne Turner graduated with a degree in fine art from Saint Mary’s College of Notre Dame. Her life plan was simple: “I was going to be a painter who lived alone. And drank a lot.” Instead, shortly out of college, she met my father. She already had a boyfriend; he asked to be her friend. Three weeks later, he proposed. “I just have to break up with my boyfriend,” she said. Thirty-eight years of marriage and four kids later, my mom has cycled through a few art forms. She worked with acrylic paints—until she had my brother, Dewey, who bit through the paint tubes. So she switched to weaving—until she had my brother, Patrick, who took a scissors to her loom. She had taken her first quilting class while pregnant with me, and so when we moved to Fort Bragg, California, she was thrilled to find the local quilting group. Now she’s been a quilter for twenty-seven. She was the featured artist at the local quilt show in 2013, and has taken home dozens of ribbons through the years. People’s Choice is her favorite category.

My sister is also an artist. She studied studio art at UC Santa Cruz, focusing on painting. Her paintings are large and abstract, filled with beautiful colors and geometric shapes. After college, Katie got a job at Santa Cruz Sock Shop and Shoe Company, where she quickly became one of the star employees. By twenty-five, she had already managed two sock stores, and had idea for her future: she would open her own sock store back in FortKatie Turner-Carr with Marshall and kidsBragg, California. My father was skeptical. Would a community as small as ours sustain such a business? He imagined the majority of her business would be tourists. She imagined the opposite: locals. “Everyone needs socks,” she said. Why Fort Bragg? Her reasoning wasn’t too different from my parents, back in 1992—she wanted start both her business and her family in a community. So in 2006, my sister returned home to start the next chapter of her life. Her first store was twelve by fourteen feet carved out of the front of the Flobeds building on Redwood Avenue. Because the store was so off the beaten path, all of her customers were locals—and the business flourished. By 2008, she was able to move to Laurel Street, right n the middle of downtown, where she remains today. And by 2009, she and her husband, Marshall Carr, had started their family.

And her art? My mom thinks Katie has merged the two passions: “It’s a study in color, just walking into that store.” Plus, she’s busy working on two other masterpieces at the moment: her daughters, Rowan and Zoey, ages 8 and 6.

Our brother Dewey Turner never expected to be running the family business—partly because working for our father isn’t easy. For reference, I was only employed at Flobeds for a month before I was fired for insubordination. Our brother Packie lasted only one summer. And Katie was never foolish enough to take the job. Dewey, however, worked his way up from shipping, to sales, to general manager. If you have a question about the daily operation of Flobeds, you will be directed to Dewey. He knows every moving piece in the complicated business, and keeps things running smoothly. But before he was our father’s right hand and a family man in his own right—he and his wife Jamie have two wonderful daughters who he is quick to describe as the light of his life—Dewey at the ball he was a rebellious high school basketball star who couldn’t wait to get out of town.

Dewey’s passion for basketball was so extreme, and his three point average so high, that he was once targeted for a nasty technical foul that scratched his cornea. He left the court bleeding from the eye, and my mother drove him to the eye doctor. He only had one question for the doctor: “Can I finish the game?” And he did—wearing an eye patch. His passion for the game is contagious—as an assistant coach to the varsity team, he keeps the players enthusiastic about what they’rePackie and Dewey doing. But the first fire he lit was closer to home: our brother, Packie.

Packie recalls getting obsessed with basketball right whenPackie played night and day Dewey made the Varsity team. At the age of nine, he started studying Dewey’s games. He practiced dribbling one hundred times with each hand, daily. He and Dewey convinced my dad to lay down cement in part of the backyard, making a half court for them to practice. Packie was outside nearly every day, practicing his three point shot. By high school, he was a two-time league MVP. He went to college on an athletic scholarship, and was on a team all four years.

So, we were all surprised when, after college, he announced he wanted to join the bed business. He had developed a mattress topper in one of his business classes, and he had a business model that looked pretty good. He knew the industry, and knew he could use a few of my father’s suppliers. He and his wife, Bianca, moved back to Fort Bragg to start their company, Bed Bandits. But to support them while the business was starting, Packie also continued his constant side business: training kids in basketball.

It was this side business that eventually changed Packie’s life. One of the kids he trained in the Bay Area went away to a basketball camp—and his skills blew away the other trainers. The next thing Packie knew, he was being headhunted by the camp. But he wouldn’t be won so easily: “They wanted me to sign a non-disclosure, non-compete contract, and I said, look: you didn’t invent the game of basketball. I won’t sign that.” Meanwhile, he continued trying to make his mattress topper business take off. That is, until he got the next call: to help train Steph Curry.

Packie and Bianca with Steph and Festus Now, Packie is a full-time professional basketball skills trainer. His clients range from five year-olds to NBA starters. He just opened up his own gym in the bay area, where he and his wife live now, and he sometimes travels with a few of his top clients. He’s had to leave the mattress business to the professionals—Flobeds absorbed the topper business.

As for me, I might seem like the family outlier. I’m the only one of the four kids who hasn’t yet moved home and attempted to run a business. In fact, after practically growing up inside the family business, I was very determined never to go into business for myself. So, I studied the exact opposite: theatre. There’s nothing less profitable in the world than theatre, which almost always runs at a loss. And, because of how time-consuming it is, you’re almost always losing money while you’re doing it. Plus, it’s horribly temporary. You’re basically making a product that costs more than most people are willing to spend, only reaches a very limited group of people, and then disappears. It’s the world’s worst business plan—and one of the world’s oldest art forms.

I didn’t think I’d become a playwright. I thought maybe I’d be an actor. Then I realized that was a lifetime of waiting for someone else to say yes to you. So, I thought maybe I’d be a director. Then I realized I wasn’t very interested in where everyone was standing. I even tried my hand at sound design, listening to the same two seconds of material hundreds of times before I finally gave in to the inevitable: I’m a writer. I’ve always been writing, privately, while acting publically. Finally, I put the two together and discovered—I was horrible at it. Not good at all. But I really wanted to learn.

After graduating from college, I moved to New York City, where I lived in strangers’ homes as a dog-sitter for two months before I found my own apartment and job. I wrote on my lunch breaks, and between phone calls at work. I wrote sort of desperately those first few months. Eventually I applied to graduate school, and started at Rutgers University in New Jersey—which I commuted to from Brooklyn, spending two hours on the train each way three days a week. I kept my part-time job in the city, and took on another part-time job as a TA.

When I graduated from Rutgers, I had hoped to be in a significantly better place than I had been when I enrolled. Instead, I was literally in the same place: same studio apartment, same underemployment. And then, within that same month, I got a row of rejection letters from various institutions I had applied to, and went through a horribly messy breakup. I sat down with a friend and swore that I would never write again, “At least no more comedies. And I’m never going to write about love again.” My friend nodded. Then he asked me to remind him of that one story I was so obsessed with. By the end of the day, I had the first draft of Bull in a China Shop.

Six months later, I was walking down the street with another friend when I got a phone call. It was the artistic director of LCT3, the emerging artist wing of Lincoln Center. He said, “I want to produce your play, what do you think about that?” I said, “I think you’re crazy.” After the play’s success, my mother called me, laughing. “You’re a business now,” she said.

For years, my dad has been signing off his Flobeds emails with a joke advisory statement about his product: “your dreams may vary.” But it’s come to mean a lot more than that to us. Your dreams may vary—not only from each other’s but also over time. “Sometimes the dream changes,” my mother says looking back over the last nearly forty years she’s spent with my father, looking at the life they’ve managed to build together by adapting, changing. Where you are, what you’re doing, what the goals are—it can all change. At Flobeds, they have a warrantee called the Goldilocks Guarantee: “Life happens; people change. Your mattress can change with you.” Paying attention, making the right changes for yourself, your family, and your future—that’s what we’re all about in business and in life.

It’s the adaptability instinct that my dad brought to city council when he joined in 2002, right as the local lumber mill, the city’s largest employer, was shutting its doors. He ran with the slogan: “Focus on the Future,” and was already imagining a time whenMayor Dave Turner at completed Trestlethe trestle over Pudding Creek would be useable again, when the coast along the mill site would be cleaned and opened for public use, and when we might even have our own local marine science center. After 15 years on council, those dreams have all become realities. Each time I come home, I walk the newly opened South Coast trail, remembering how difficult the process was, how far-fetched it seemed at times. And as the path turns and leads to the Noyo Center, my dad always speeds up, taking me to the container that houses the blue whale bones, excitedly talking about the day they’ll be displayed for all to see. All these years later, and he’s still chasing the whale on the horizon—just like all of us.

But remember: your dreams may vary.

Anne's Tree of Life
Anne Turner’s “Tree of Life” Quilt

Where Will You Sleep

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As the year comes to a close… we count our blessings and hug/write/call our loved ones. Here at FloBeds we wish the best for you and yours… and the old chestnut can’t be forgot:

“Peace on Earth and Goodwill to All”

Thanks for being part of our FloBeds family.

 

 

Latex Mattress FAQ

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  1. Where can I buy a natural latex mattress?
    In the 1940’s and 1950’s latex was the popular good quality mattress material. With the advent of national brands developed through advertising on the three major networks, in combination with rising dominance of department stores, cost cutting became more important than quality. The “Big S’s” — Simmons, Sealy, Serta, Spring Air — replaced latex foam rubber with the cheaper polyurethane foam. The then largest purchaser of foam rubber, the auto industry, also switched due to cost and weight. Soon there was only one producer of latex foam rubber in the United States (Latex International, now known as Talalay Global). In the 1980’s and early 1990’s Englander Mattress Company was the only distributer of latex mattresses through-out the United States. Meanwhile, in Europe latex foam rubber remained the quality mattress material of choice. One reason was the difficulty of mass marketing in Europe where language and currency created smaller trade areas and rewarded quality over marketing.In 1996, while in semi-retirement on the north coast of California, water bed entrepreneur was looking for the right materials to put into his on-line mattress project. Dave Turner met Roger Coffee from Latex International at a trade show and saw the potential high quality latex in his new Customizable Mattress sold directly to the consumer via his new website: FloBeds.com. At first FloBeds offered half-latex/half-water or half-latex/half-air or half-latex/half-firmer-latex shipped direct to the customer via UPS. It wasn’t long before Dave saw that the customer almost always preferred the latex side and the water and air were dropped from the system. FloBeds became the largest west coast distributer of latex. Thus began the modern online direct-to-consumer bed-in-a-box business. At first the traditional companies smiled and asked “who would want a mattress that had different firmnesses on each side?” FloBeds quietly grew by double digits each year. A few companies copied the design.Then along came Casper Mattress with its’ $15 million it raised from investors like Ashton Kutcher, Nas, and designer Steven Alan. “Keep It Simple Stupid” matched with great marketing proved to be a one-mattress-fits-all winner in the low-end mattress world But they only had 3/4″ of latex and 3/4″ of memory foam over… you guessed it: polyurethane. Watching their sales rocket to $20 million in the first year was like throwing one hundred dollar bills in a crowed New York intersection. Over 5 new startups mobbed the online mattress business.A few have latex. Most are sub $1,000 products with plain vanilla ingredients and a million dollar marketing effort. Here are some of bigger advertisers:

    Leesa
    Yogabed
    Cocoon
    Eve
    Saatva’s Loom & Leaf division
    Dreambed
    Bedinabox
    Helix
    GhostBed
    Amerisleep
    Lul
    WinkBeds
    Nest bedding
    Layla
    Novosbed
    Brooklyn Bedding
    Intellibed
    Purple
    PlushBeds
    Alexander by Nest
    Zenhaven by Saatva
    Spindle Mattress
    Aviya
    Turf & Needle
    Bear Mattress
    Hyphen
    EzoBed
    Dream on One
    Nolah
    Eve
    Endy
    Brentwood Home
    Zinus
    Luxi
    SonnoBed
    Ameena
    myCloud
    WRiGHT
    Yogabed
    Organica Mattress
    Safavieh Dream
    and then there is FloBeds, most of whose customers come by word of mouth.

  2. What is the best natural mattress?
    There are several companies that make very good natural mattresses. One of the best is Royalpedic. OMI makes a very good organic mattress line, as does Savvyrest. FloBeds was the first to use natural wool as a fire barrier to pass the 2007 Federal Standard for the Flammability of Mattress Sets (Open Flame Test) — Consumer Product Safety Commission – 16 CFR Part 1633. The CPSC didn’t believe FloBeds could pass without using FR chemicals or artificial barriers. They sent two inspectors to the north coast of California and picked up two FloBeds Natural Latex Mattresses covered with Organic Cotton and Wool.
  3. What is the best natural latex mattress?
    There are three competitors for the best of class: OMI, Savvyrest and FloBeds.
  4. How to buy a natural mattress.
    The first thing is to consider your sleeping needs. Do you sleep on your back, side or stomach… or a combination of those? Do you have pain issues with shoulders or hips when you sleep on your side? How much do you weigh? Does your partner weight more or less than you? Do you generally like firmer or softer mattresses. Make sure you can change your firmness after you receive your new mattress. And if you can not get your firmness just right, make sure you can get your money back. Be sure each of you can have the firmness on your side correct for your body, your pressure points, your spine and your good night’s sleep. And then make sure you can adjust your mattress firmness for the life of the mattress, which should be at least 20 years.
  5. How to choose a natural mattress.
    Service: Look for a company with a reputation for taking care of its customers over the long haul. Not just a couple of years, but at least 10 years. Prefferably for over 20, because you want them to be there when you need them… not just cashing in on a trend and then moving on or disbanding.Quality: Look for superior components like Natural Talalay Latex, Organic Cotton, American or European raised Organic Wool and FSC certified lumber.Value: Look for honest pricing, without the ever-lasting sale. Prices that are fair. Weigh quality and service combined with price.
  6. How to order a natural mattress How to buy a latex mattress.
    Order a mattress only after assuring yourself:
    –That your personal sleep demographics (age, weight, sleep position, sex, etc.) have been taken into account.
    –That you can change firmness, now and over the life of the mattress. (And that the company has a history of always having on hand the inventory you might need.)
    –That you can get your money back.
    –That it will be shipped to you within 1-3 days.
  7. Where to buy a latex mattress.
    Look for honesty, quality and service. Consider OMI, Savvyrest and FloBeds.

  8. Latex mattress – which brand is best
    ?
    OMI, Savvyrest and FloBeds.
  9. Which latex mattress should I buy?
    Consider your sleeping needs. See FAQ 6 and 7 above.

  10. Which latex mattress is the best?
    — What’s the best latex mattress on the market? — What’s the best latex mattress?
    The FloBeds vZone is made with the highest quality components and has the most versatility.
  11. Who makes the best latex mattress?
    OMI, Savvyrest and FloBeds.
  12. What is a talalay latex mattress?
    The undesputed superior latex is Talalay. It takes five times as long to make a Talalay latex core than a Dunlop latex core. Talaly is more consistant, supple and comfortable.
    *Liquid rubber whipped into a foam and poured into a mold.
    *When closed the mold has rods that go through the foamed rubber.
    *A vacuum is placed on the mold, which removes air bubbles/pockets and distributes the liquid rubber evenly through the mold.
    *CO2 is run through the rods, freezing the foamed rubber and locking in the consistency.
    *Heat is sent through the rods, providing even temperature and yielding a consistent latex cores without air pockets or uneven firmnesses.
  13. What is an organic latex mattress? What is a natural latex mattress?
    The undesputed superior latex is Talalay. It takes five times as long to make a Talalay latex core than a Dunlop latex core. Talaly is more consistant, supple and comfortable. Both come in a complete range of firmnesses (some companies make their latex mattresses with Dunlop on the bottom and Talalay on top, saying “you want firmer base”, but that does not make comfort sense. Firm Talalay on bottom will feel the same as Firm Dulnop on bottom: you just won’t be able to move the Dunlop up closer to your body without comprising the pressure relief gained from Talalay). So, taking the cleanest, best Natural Talalay Latex and surrounding it with Organic Cotton and Wool makes the best organic latex mattress.
  14. How firm is a latex mattress?
    Some companies make their latex mattress in one or two firmnesses. This means you are choosing a firmness for the convenience of the company, not what your body needs. For over 20 years FloBeds has been offering 5 firmness cores (Soft, Medium, Firm, Extra-Firm and SuperFirm) in up to 13 firmness combinations (S/S, S/M, M/S, M/M, M/F, F/M, F/F, F/XF, XF/F, XF/XF, XF/SF, SF/XF and SF/SF). Consider that 13 firmnesses was for the 2-core layer Select from the 1990’s, and that now that FloBeds has a vZone with changeable Zones and a 3-core layer Deluxe the combinations are in the hundreds. With a FloBed, you are guaranteed your firmness will be Just Right.
  15. How much does a latex mattress cost?
    Latex mattresses cost from $699 to $8,000. The OMI Duo king is $8,000. Savvyrest Unity Pillowtop king is $5,000. FloBeds vZone king is $3,000.
  16. How is a latex mattress is made? How are latex mattress made?
    Latex is a milky white liquid composed of rubber particles dispersed in water. This material is whipped with air to form a foam, which is heated to produce foam rubber, or latex. The soft, supple products of a real foam rubber are what make our products superior. Latex is inherently hypo-allergenic, anti-microbial and dust-mite resistant. Latex is not a plastic foam, like polyurethane or furniture foam. It is a denser product made of rubber to last a lifetime. Unlike urethane, latex will feel as good years from now as it does the day it is produced.
  17. Are latex mattresses comfortable?
    No other mattress material confoms to your body’s nooks and crannies like Talalay latex. It pushes back in just the right places. It doesn’t break down and cause your back to sag.

  18. Are latex mattresses better than spring?

    Latex mattresses out-last and out-perform springs. It contours to your body and provides support where you need it. Because latex is a natural product (made from the milk of the rubber tree) it costs more than a twist of wire into a spring.
  19. Are latex mattresses less toxic?
    Mattresses companies over the last 50 years have created unhealthy sleep environments. The polyfoam has chemicals you don’t want to breathe. FR chemicals are even worse. Natural latex combined with a cover made with organic cotton and wool make the cleanest mattress possible.
  20. Are latex mattresses good for back pain?
    Latex mattresses that offer the ability to adjust your firmness are the answer to a lifetime of back pain. The right firmness of Talalay latex can align your spine and relieve pressure points. Side sleepers that suffer from back pain will want to look a zone layer that can be adjusted at each pressure point (like the FloBeds vZone).
  21. Are latex mattresses hot?
    Latex mattress made from Talalay latex have an open cell foam rubber structure, allow air to move and help you sleep cool. Surround the Talalay latex with Organic cotton & wool for maximum air circulation and you will sleep cool and comfortable. Add a slatted foundation to enhance air flow and you have covered all the bases.

All About Latex Mattresses and A Good Night’s Sleep

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We all need our sleep:  beauty, brains, energy or just for rest and recuperation.

You may have heard of the six sleep admonitions to getting a good night’s sleep:

  1. Keep to a schedule, even on weekends.
  2. Maintain a bedtime pattern.
  3. Get exercise everyday, but not just before bed.
  4. Don’t eat or drink alcohol or caffeine before bedtime.
  5. Keep your bedroom environment conducive to sleep: cool, dark and quiet.
  6. Give your body (spine, lumbar, shoulders and hips) the support it requires with a proper mattress.

If you can take care of items 1 – 5, we can help you get a mattress that, as Goldilocks said, is Just Right.

To design a mattress that gives you spinal alignment as well as relief for your pressure points, just take a momement to tell us about your six sleep demographics:

Go Ahead, Make My Bed
Click here and we will design your sleep system

 

  1. How old are you?
  2. What is your height?
  3. What is your weight?
  4. Are you male or female?
  5. Do you predominantly sleep on your back, stomach or side?
  6. Do you generally like your mattress softer or firmer.

We make every mattress out of Talalay Latex surrounded by Organic EuroKnit Cotton quilted to Organic Wool.  Each side is designed for each sleeper.  Life

Click to see our 20 yearGoldilocks Guarantee
Click to see our 20 year Goldilocks Guarantee

is too short to compromise on proper support in your mattress.  We will build your mattress to your sleep demographics.  And every FloBed is adjustable.  With our Goldilocks Guarantee you can make it softer or firmer for the 20 year life of the mattress.

Because we manufacture every FloBed latex mattress and ship it directly to you, we can afford to put in the very best materials and provide you with unparalleled customer service.    All at a price that is less than you will find in the traditional distribution cycle because you are only paying for the materials and the 10 person company that makes your FloBed.  You are not paying for storefronts, wholesale and retail sales force, extra transport and all the usual cost of doing business.  You get a Talalay Latex Mattress and a money back guarantee as well as a Goldilocks Guarantee allowing you to order new firmness cores at a steep discount for 20 years.

Not losing sight…

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DaveDeskWord

Back in the 1996 we had a crazy dream: allow customers to design a quality mattress online that would meet their sleeping needs… not just a good compromise, but a mattress each sleeper could choose the right mattress configuration for their body.  Five years later Temma Ehrenfeld, of Newsweek, coined “Goldilocks Was Right” newsweek-189after purchasing a FloBed and then writing about it…
and we’ve been helping folks make their bed “Just Right” ever since.

The one thing we have never lost sight of is treating our customers like we would want to be treated. That adds up to: 1) making our mattresses out of the best materials we can find — Talalay latex of just the right firmness combinations cut precisely to fit together in a single unit of individualized comfort and 2) unparalleled customer service.

…More –>FloBeds Blog

Visiting NYC

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BrynaTurnerAnne and I took are visiting New York City and our daughter, Bryna, to witness her professional playwriting debut.  The Lincoln Center LCT3 Theater is producing  her comedy: Bull in a China Shop (LCT3 produces shows by new playwrights, directors and designers).  http://www.lct.org/shows/bull-china-shop/

Needless to say, we are proud parents and are having a blast.  The play is still in previews and it is amazing to watch the actors, director and playwright fine tune the production up until the March 1st opening.  Last night the cast and show were surprised and thrilled to find  Gloria Steinem and Christine Ann Lahti in the audience.

Gloria Steinam and
Gloria Steinam and Christine Ann Lehti visit after show.  (They loved it, btw:)

I’m supposed to be working on the new website from our apartment in the Upper West Side… but this is just too much fun.  (Dewey, I promise to get to it.)  I am excited to showcase the easier to navigate site (especially on mobile) and can’t wait to get customer feedback on our latex mattresses .

We arrived the night before the February snow… we knew it might come, but 10 inches?  Come on!

Anne walking back from the Metropolitan Museum

It’s pretty much gone now, but us Californians still get shocked walking out in to a 30 degree (feels like 20) morning.

2017 and We’re Just Getting Started!

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2017 is here and January almost done. Wow! We’ve been working on a new

1skiwebsite to make it easier for enjoying on mobile devices. Please let us know how you like it. (Or don’t:(

One of the goals of this year is to have a more in depth engagement with our customers after the sweet dreams have begun. We have implemented a 3rd party review system to reach out and provide opportunities for feedback, both on our website and company as well as product reviews.

 

Often imitated, never duplicated.

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Back in the 90s, we were shipping common carrier. We worked hard to make it possible to ship our latex mattress and quality foundation via UPS by 1998. And we never lost sight of the importance of having the right support for each person. We knew that people of different age, weight, height and sleeping positions deserve a mattress that is built for them.

It is fun to see all the mattress companies popping up on the Internet, making “bed-in-a-box” ubiquitous. But as they say: As they say: “Often imitated, never duplicated.”

The “Boxing” is just one part… Many of these ghostly wanna-be’s promote “one firmness fits all”. Crazy, but at last count there were over 60 of these companies… usually offering a couple of inches of latex or memory foam on top of inexpensive polyurethane foam. Glad you found us in the increasing noisy Internet mattress market. We know we have to make each side right. We believe you deserve a mattress made with more than one or two inches of latex (ours, of course, is 100% latex. Top-to-Bottom, Side-to-Side). And of course you deserve a company famous for its unparalleled customer service. Maybe age does matter.
In Beds for 28 years, on the web since 1996

The original
The original bed in box… and qualilty too!