All About Latex Mattresses and A Good Night’s Sleep

Morning on the Fort Bragg Coast
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We all need our sleep:  beauty, brains, energy or just for rest and recuperation.

You may have heard of the six sleep admonitions to getting a good night’s sleep:

  1. Keep to a schedule, even on weekends.
  2. Maintain a bedtime pattern.
  3. Get exercise everyday, but not just before bed.
  4. Don’t eat or drink alcohol or caffeine before bedtime.
  5. Keep your bedroom environment conducive to sleep: cool, dark and quiet.
  6. Give your body (spine, lumbar, shoulders and hips) the support it requires with a proper mattress.

If you can take care of items 1 – 5, we can help you get a mattress that, as Goldilocks said, is Just Right.

To design a mattress that gives you spinal alignment as well as relief for your pressure points, just take a momement to tell us about your six sleep demographics:

Go Ahead, Make My Bed
Click here and we will design your sleep system

 

  1. How old are you?
  2. What is your height?
  3. What is your weight?
  4. Are you male or female?
  5. Do you predominantly sleep on your back, stomach or side?
  6. Do you generally like your mattress softer or firmer.

We make every mattress out of Talalay Latex surrounded by Organic EuroKnit Cotton quilted to Organic Wool.  Each side is designed for each sleeper.  Life

Click to see our 20 yearGoldilocks Guarantee
Click to see our 20 year Goldilocks Guarantee

is too short to compromise on proper support in your mattress.  We will build your mattress to your sleep demographics.  And every FloBed is adjustable.  With our Goldilocks Guarantee you can make it softer or firmer for the 20 year life of the mattress.

Because we manufacture every FloBed latex mattress and ship it directly to you, we can afford to put in the very best materials and provide you with unparalleled customer service.    All at a price that is less than you will find in the traditional distribution cycle because you are only paying for the materials and the 10 person company that makes your FloBed.  You are not paying for storefronts, wholesale and retail sales force, extra transport and all the usual cost of doing business.  You get a Talalay Latex Mattress and a money back guarantee as well as a Goldilocks Guarantee allowing you to order new firmness cores at a steep discount for 20 years.

Should being tired, be something we want?

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Being Tired isn’t a badge of honor

being tired isn't a badge of honorBeing tired isn’t a badge of honor

Co-founder & CEO of Basecamp

Whenever I speak at a conference, I try to catch a few of the other presentations. I tend to stand in the back and listen, observe, and get a general sense of the room.

Lately, I’ve been hearing something that disturbs me. A lot of entrepreneurs on stage have been bragging about not sleeping, telling their audiences about their 16-hour days, and making it sound like hustle-at-all-costs is the way ahead. Rest be damned, they say there’s an endless amount of work to do.

I think this message is one of the most harmful in all of business. Sustained exhaustion is not a rite of passage. It’s a mark of stupidity. Literally. Scientists have suggested that scores on IQ tests decline on each successive day you sleep less than you naturally would. It doesn’t take long before the difference is telling.

People pulling 16-hour days on a regular basis are exhausted. They’re just too tired to notice that their work has suffered because of it.

And there’s more to not getting enough sleep than compromising your own health and creativity. It affects the people around you. When you’re short on sleep, you’re short on patience. You’re ruder to people, less tolerant, less understanding. It’s harder to relate and to pay attention for sustained periods of time.

Sleep-deprived managers are terrible managers, too, not least because of the awful example they set. Why spend the time and money to recruit a brilliant staff if you’re going to drive everyone into a state of insensibility?

If the point of working long hours is to get more work done, and you care about the quality of your work, how can you justify sustained lack of sleep? The only people who try to do so are tired and not thinking straight.

One argument I hear a lot about working long hours is that when you’re just getting started, you have to give it everything you’ve got. I understand that feeling. And there’s certainly some truth to it.

But here’s what I see happen over and over: People don’t stop working that way. We’re creatures of habit. The things you do when you start doing something tend to be the things you continue to do. If you work long hours at the beginning, and that’s all you know, you can easily condition yourself to think this is the only way to operate. I’ve seen so many entrepreneurs burn out following this pattern.

So it’s important especially when you’re forming your habits to get a ton of sleep. You’ll start better, think better, and be a better colleague and boss.Sleep is great for creativity. Sleep is great for problem solving. Aren’t these the things you want more of, not less of, at work?

Your brain is still active at night. It works through matters you can’t address during the day. Don’t you want to wake up with new solutions in your headrather than bags under your eyes?

Yes, sometimes emergencies require extra hours. And, yes, sometimes deadlines can’t be moved and you’ll need to make an extra push at the end. That happens. And that’s OK, because the exhaustion is not sustained; it’s temporary. Such cases should be the exception, not the rule.

In the long run, work is not more important than sleep. If you aren’t sure how important sleep is, think about this: You’ll die faster without sleep than you will without food.

And, on balance, very few problems need to be solved at the 12th, 13th, 14th, or 15th hour of a workday. Nearly everything can wait until morning.

At Basecamp we think 40-hours a week is plenty. We encourage everyone to get a full night’s sleep, every night.

Good night, and sleep well!

And BTW, here’s why Aetna’s CEO pays employees up to $500 to sleep well. Science backs it up.

Yoga Bedtime Routine

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Having a hard time falling asleep? Don’t worry you are not alone! This time of year is difficult as we are transitioning from summer into fall. Weather will be changing soon, children are going back to school, and before you know it Thanksgiving will be upon us. Life can get hectic, but it is important to take time out of your day to slow down. An easy way to wind down after a long day is bedtime yoga.

According to the International Journal of Yoga:

“Mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia are among the most common reasons for individuals to seek treatment with complementary therapies such as yoga. Yoga encourages one to relax, slow the breath and focus on the present, shifting the balance from the sympathetic nervous system and the flight-or-fight response to the parasympathetic system and the relaxation response.”

Here is a great 20-minute bedtime yoga routine:

Finely Crafted Tranquility

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Our customers love the Prodigy 2.0 Adjustable Base from Leggett & Platt.

Here is what one customer said about why she decide to get an adjustable base:

“I constantly struggle with pain in my sciatica. When I raise my feet and head at the same time in the adjustable bed, I feel some pressure relief in my back.

Also, my husband has asthma and finds that he sleeps best when he is propped up. Instead of using all of our pillows to prop himself up, now all he has to do is raise the head on his side of the bed.

It is convenient for both of us because we can adjust each side to fit our personal needs. Having the adjustable base for our FloBed natural latex matttress has made a huge difference in the quality of our sleep.”

-Maria

If you are interested in hearing more about our best selling adjustable base, the Prodigy 2.0, take a look at the video below:

Sunday Night Sleep Tips

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Here are some great tips to help make your Sunday nights a little easier:

  1. Keep the same bedtime on weekends. Staying up late two nights out of the week will throw off your sleep schedule and make it hard to wake up on Monday morning.
  2. Avoid sleeping in on weekends. Do not sleep more than one or two hours past your normal wake-up time.
  3. Enjoy your Sunday night. Plan a fun Sunday night ritual, that way you can look forward to Sunday evenings instead of dreading them.
  4. Prep for bedtime. “…pamper yourself pre-bed with a warm bath, a cup of tea, or a good book to help you relax.” –Sleep.org

If all of the above fails, its time to think about a latex mattress ;-)

Sleep Better During Pregnancy

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“We received our latex bed in early October due to a recommendation of a friend. About two weeks later, we were lucky enough to find out our second kid is on the way come June 8. My wife spent her first pregnancy on a 15 year old mattress and didn’t sleep well. This pregnancy she is sleeping better and more soundly, even with our 3 year old daughter in the bed with us. It is amazing how less movement transfer there is between sides of the bed and the latex support is “awesome” for the wife. We’re looking forward to the next 20 years of sound sleeping. I’m so enamored that when the kids get old enough I might need to buy them latex beds themselves.” –KENT D WEDEMEYER

FloBeds Talalay latex mattresses are great for women who are pregnant because they are adjustable . As a mother progresses through each trimester, she can switch around the layers on her side of the mattress. This will ensure that she gets the support she needs throughout her pregnancy.

Golden State Warriors Andre Iguodala

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“You snooze you loose.”

“I’ll sleep when I’m dead.”

It is time to change the way our culture looks at sleep.

Golden State Warriors are amidst another championship run and the 2015 Finals MVP Andre Iguodala sat down to speak with Arianna Huffington, the author of Sleep Revolution. He states that research showed, “Getting enough sleep directly affected my 3 point percentage which doubled, my free throw percentage was up 30%-40%, my turnovers were way down, I got more steals.”

Andre’s Bedtime Routine is essential to getting better sleep. His routine is as follows:

  1. 10:30 settled down in bed with a book
  2. Meditation with breathing exercises
  3. Turning the temperature down in the room
  4. No TV in the bedroom
  5. Legs and head are elevated appropriately

Andrea has been able to balance sleep and work to live a healthy and successful life. Think about changes you can make to your bedtime routine to be able to lead a better life.

To learn more about the MVP’s sleeping habits watch the video featured in the Time article by clicking here.

 

The Sleep Revolution

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Arriana

The Sleep Revolution, written by Arianna Huffington, is a great read for anyone looking to be more successful in life. As she explains in the interview video below, there are many reasons we need to reevaluate the importance of sleep in our lives.

  1. When you are well rested you are less likely to dwell on mistakes and more mentally capable of moving forward.
  2. Lack of sleep has been linked to obesity, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and Alzheimer’s.
  3. Insufficient sleep leads suppressed immune system and sickness.

We stopped valuing sleep during the first industrial revolution. Society believed humans could work like machines, but the truth is we cannot. Tink about the role sleep plays in your life and where if falls on your priority list. It’s time to move sleep closer to the top of that list.

Sleep your way to the top!

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Arianna Huffington’s Sleep Revolution Starts at Home

By BOB MORRIS
APRIL 28, 2016

NY Times

Arianna Huffington was sitting like a very relaxed queen in her SoHo bedroom on a thronelike bergère chair covered in brocade Fortuny fabric. It was time to wind down, 8 p.m. Behind her, an embroidered throw pillow announced: “Sleep your way to the top.”

The phrase recalls a TED Talk she gave in 2010, and it isn’t about sex, thank you. It is about sleeping. “I was making a speech about sleep as a performance enhancer,” she said. “As opposed to being lazy or not engaged with life.”

One wouldn’t think that about one of the most powerful women in the world, the author of 15 books and a founder of a news site that sold to AOLfor $315 million in 2011. But of all the things on her agenda, which would exhaust most mortals, sleep is at the top.

Her new book, “The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time” (Harmony), is a call to bed. It is also inspiring a turbocharged national tour that involves “sleep fairs” at colleges and an educational “takeover” of a JetBlue flight during which she gave out books and answered questions.

“I want to rekindle our romance with sleep,” said Ms. Huffington, 65, in a lullaby voice as soothing as her floral perfume. “It’s a central part of life and a gateway to our dreams.”

If sleep is a gateway to her dreams, then her bedroom is the mother ship. It is one of four in a vast apartment she transformed a few years ago with the help of the designer Steven Gambrel.

“It was a minimalist loft,” she said. “But I wanted something that felt more lived-in and European.”

To achieve that, she hired Mr. Gambrel to add walls to break up the space, for which he also designed much of the furniture. Peter Mucek, the decorative painter, plastered the walls to emulate a golden Venetian glow.Michael S. Smith, who redecorated some rooms in the Obama White House and is a friend, suggested that she treat the loft’s concrete columns with metallic brown paint to give them an ancient bronze feel. Mr. Smith also designed some leather chairs and an ottoman. Her home now has a regal and romantic ambience that seems in perfect keeping with Ms. Huffington’s personality.

Everything in the decidedly low-tech bedroom is as carefully considered as a business move. On a bed surrounded with Fortuny curtains in a restful light blue, she sleeps on organic cotton sheets from a collection calledHuffington. The Huffington line, carried by Coco-Mat, a nearby bedding shop, was designed by her daughter Isabella Huffington, 25, an artist who shares her home. Her pillows are stuffed with soporific hops and barley. Across the room are two Gordon Parks photographs, including the bucolic“Boy With June Bug.” Over her night stand is a photograph of her other daughter, Christina, now 27, at Isabella’s christening.

“I call it a joy trigger,” Ms. Huffington said, “and I like having it right by my bed.”

Her night stand functions as a kind of altar to Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams. The books are inspirational, including works by Rumi, the 13th-century Persian poet, and Marcus Aurelius, whom Ms. Huffington admires because he was a multitasking Roman emperor and not easily ruffled. There is a simple alarm clock from Pottery Barn without any of the pesky digital lights she bans from her bedroom and from her hotel rooms. (She packs masking tape to obscure their blinking.)

Roses and peonies rest in a vase by a journal with a black cover decorated by Isabella. Next to it is a pen light. “So if I wake up in the middle of the night, I can write down my dreams without turning on the light,” she said. Dreams, of course, are welcome; business ideas, not so much.

On a desk and dresser across the room, which she can’t reach from her bed, Ms. Huffington has several china Herend Rothschild bird bowls to hold such workaday items as Post-its and manuscript clips, and a lacquered box for her packed appointment book. “I hide the whole mess to forget about it,” she said, lifting and setting down lids like a cook.

Photo CreditAlessandra Montalto/The New York Times

At bedtime, her phone and electronic devices are relegated to the foyer outside the bedroom, to recharge under a wall of family photographs. Withdrawing from her machines, she said, is part of a half-hour “transition to sleep” ritual that includes writing down the many things she is grateful for; dimming the lights; taking a warm bath in Epsom salts by flickering candlelight; and changing into a silk nightgown to greet sleep with respect.

“I used to sleep in the same thing I wore during the day,” said Ms. Huffington, whose call to rest came in 2007, when she fell down from exhaustion and broke her cheekbone. “It’s better to have special clothes for sleeping.”

It also helps to have soundproofed windows, which required a complicated and expensive installation process that made her renovated home as quiet as a church. Indeed, her cellphone rings with the sound of cathedral chimes.

“I love church bells, don’t you?” she asked in a seductive purr.

It was time for a tour of the rest of the apartment. It is one of her two homes and very different from the one she has in California.

“My other house is from the 1920s, in Brentwood, in L.A.,” she said as she swept into her living room. “When I step out the door there, it’s into a garden of entirely white flowers, where all I smell is gardenias and it feels like being in the country. Here, it’s children, dogs and people from all over the world on my street when I walk out, and my favorite shops and restaurants.”

Her spacious living area — with a custom bookcase, a gilded Louis XV desk, gilded bronze and cobalt 18th-century candelabra and a 19th-century Italian mirror above the fireplace — has the feeling of something between a papal chamber and the Oval Office.

“Isn’t this beautiful?” she asks, gesturing to a hand-painted screen by Mr. Mucek that hides a small white kitchen area, where she doesn’t concern herself with cooking. Just the same, Ms. Huffington loves to hold the many dinners that she doesn’t prepare at a hand-painted faux marble dining table.

“I know how to make a really great cheese plate,” she said. She makes tea, too.

Near the front door is a portrait of a woman by Françoise Gilot, which Ms. Gilot, who spent 10 years with Picasso, gave Ms. Huffington around the time Ms. Huffington was writing Picasso: Creator and Destroyer,published in 1988. The portrait of her daughters is by Nelson Shanks, who also painted Bill Clinton, Pope John Paul II and Diana, Princess of Wales.

“But what I love most of all are the works of my daughter Isabella,” she said.

As if on cue, Isabella emerged from an art studio next to her bedroom. (Christina has her own place.) The two put their arms around each other. The daughter, as it turns out, also respects a good night’s sleep.

“Even in college, I’d get nine hours of sleep a night,” said Isabella, who is as tall and graceful as her mother and whose pretty collages have a dark political edge. “Remember when you’d visit, and my friends were pulling all-nighters, and you’d lecture them about it?”

Her mother laughed. No need for that at home. It was 10 o’clock, and with a television appearance scheduled for early the next day, time to dim the lights and take the moment seriously.

“My sleep ritual is about to begin,” Ms. Huffington said with a beatific smile. She looked to the double doors leading to her bedroom. “My gateway calls.”

The church bells on her phone were ringing. She ignored them.

Original New York Times Article and Slide Show